Derm Scan

Breakthrough in Understanding How Skin Cancer Develops

December 13, 2018

After 14 years of investigative work, Dr. Rebecca Morris, member of the Masonic Cancer Center, published an innovative study on skin cancer. Her research induced carcinogenesis with a hydrocarbon carcinogen and a plant compound using a bone marrow transplantation model.

"Our research is a gateway to studying new therapeutic targets so we can intervene earlier to stop the development of skin cancer," said Dr. Morris. "This research demonstrates that although many skin cancers are induced by stem cells, and these cancers develop because of what is going on elsewhere.  While it is surprising information, it is important because we can aim for better targets and stop cancer progression at the true source."

Dr. Morris' research is sure to have a large impact as skin cancer is the most common form of cancer with it affecting about 3.3 million Americans each year, according to the American Cancer Society.

For the full article, please visit nature.com/articles.

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